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Description

Model  U.S Canada U.K
12V White In Stock
In Stock Build upon request (4-5 weeks)
12V Black In Stock In Stock In Stock
24V White In Stock Build upon request (4-5 weeks) Build upon request (4-5 weeks)
24V Black In Stock Build upon request (4-5 weeks) Build upon request (4-5 weeks)


This super-efficient DC-powered rooftop air conditioner is designed from the ground up to maximize the comfort of your outdoor adventure. With the DC-powered twin-cylinder rotor compressor, Velit 2000R draws as low as 20A (at 12V) and is able to deliver fresh cool air to you at up to 126F for an extended period of time without needing a giant inverter which is required for traditional RV ACs. It also has a slim profile with only 7” of clearance and can easily fit in the standard 14x14 rooftop cutouts. 


This is a complete kit. For van installs or other uneven surfaces,  you need to purchase the sealant separately.  Sealant is not required for flat surface installs such as RV roofs. 

Inside the box:
  • AC unit
  • Mounting brackets
  • Sealing gasket
  • Mounting hardware
  • Interior trim panel
  • Remote
  • 15ft wiring harness with in-line fuse (6AWG for 12V, 8AWG for 24V)
  • User manual

* One-year limited warranty

SPECS

Model

2000R

Input Voltage

DC12V/24/48V

Operating Current

20A-60A/10-33/5-18A

Cooling Capacity

8000BTU/ 2200W

Air Flow Rate

250 CFM

Rated Power

650W

Refrigerant

R134a 750g

Power Consumption 

Eco mode: 550w

Boost mode:680w

Noise Level

Eco mode: 45dB

Boost mode:58dB

Roof Unit Dimension

W31.5”*L31.5”*H7.1”

Inner Unit Dimension

W13.8”*L11”*H4.3”

Weight

66lb

Application
Application: Truck, van, boat, trailer, camper, machinery

12V/24V/48V 8000BTU VELIT 2000R Rooftop Air Conditioner

Regular price $1,599.00

12V2000RW

  • 12V
  • 24V
  • 48V

Description

Model  U.S Canada U.K
12V White In Stock
In Stock Build upon request (4-5 weeks)
12V Black In Stock In Stock In Stock
24V White In Stock Build upon request (4-5 weeks) Build upon request (4-5 weeks)
24V Black In Stock Build upon request (4-5 weeks) Build upon request (4-5 weeks)


This super-efficient DC-powered rooftop air conditioner is designed from the ground up to maximize the comfort of your outdoor adventure. With the DC-powered twin-cylinder rotor compressor, Velit 2000R draws as low as 20A (at 12V) and is able to deliver fresh cool air to you at up to 126F for an extended period of time without needing a giant inverter which is required for traditional RV ACs. It also has a slim profile with only 7” of clearance and can easily fit in the standard 14x14 rooftop cutouts. 


This is a complete kit. For van installs or other uneven surfaces,  you need to purchase the sealant separately.  Sealant is not required for flat surface installs such as RV roofs. 

Inside the box:
  • AC unit
  • Mounting brackets
  • Sealing gasket
  • Mounting hardware
  • Interior trim panel
  • Remote
  • 15ft wiring harness with in-line fuse (6AWG for 12V, 8AWG for 24V)
  • User manual

* One-year limited warranty

SPECS

Model

2000R

Input Voltage

DC12V/24/48V

Operating Current

20A-60A/10-33/5-18A

Cooling Capacity

8000BTU/ 2200W

Air Flow Rate

250 CFM

Rated Power

650W

Refrigerant

R134a 750g

Power Consumption 

Eco mode: 550w

Boost mode:680w

Noise Level

Eco mode: 45dB

Boost mode:58dB

Roof Unit Dimension

W31.5”*L31.5”*H7.1”

Inner Unit Dimension

W13.8”*L11”*H4.3”

Weight

66lb

Application
Application: Truck, van, boat, trailer, camper, machinery
12V/24V 8000BTU VELIT 2000R Rooftop Air Conditioner
12V/24V/48V 8000BTU VELIT 2000R Rooftop Air Conditioner
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FAQs

Can I install an RV air conditioner myself?

While it is possible to install an RV air conditioner yourself, it is recommended that you hire a professional to ensure that it is installed correctly and safely.

Can I use my RV air conditioner while driving?

Yes, you can use your RV air conditioner while driving, but it is recommended that you only use it on generator power and not on battery power to avoid draining the battery.

What size RV air conditioner do I need?

The size of the RV air conditioner you need depends on the size of your RV and the climate in which you will be using it. A general rule of thumb is to have one 13,500 BTU air conditioner for every 350 square feet of living space.

Can I run my RV air conditioner on solar power?

Yes, it is possible to run an RV air conditioner on solar power, but it requires a large solar panel system and battery bank. It is also important to note that running an air conditioner on solar power may drain the battery quickly.

How often should I clean my RV air conditioner filters?

RV air conditioner filters should be cleaned or replaced at least once a month during heavy use to maintain proper airflow and performance.

Customer Reviews

Based on 48 reviews
85%
(41)
10%
(5)
2%
(1)
2%
(1)
0%
(0)
C
Chris
Velit 2000R upgrade on Winnebago Revel

We upgraded the Coleman Mach Q that came from factory on a Winnebago Revel, which consumes lots of amps, you have to run the inverter, it's noisy, and all that stuff. Made some research with another 12v brands that are way more expensive than Velit, but i decided for this one because of the price, and the good reviews that it has. It didn't disappoint, arrived well packaged, and changing it was super easy. The power that uses is a joke, i can be all day running it in ECO mode with my 3/130 batteries. It's super quiet, the height is low, and the van looks way better ( with the Coleman it was having a big box on the top of the roof ) I made lots of mods to the van, but this one is one of the best.

K
Kenric
Test Results - 12v Velit AC & 175w Renogy Solar Panels

Limited to 5000 characters here. Posted the full review with pictures and data on Sprinter Source. here is the link...
https://sprinter-source.com/forums/index.php?threads/125293/#post-1386355

AC + Solar install and test results
We use our van for trips where we might likely be off grid but would move the van (recharge via alternator) at least once every 2-3 days.

Our Sprinter 170 has an Adventure Wagon interior. All of the interior metal walls and ceilings have Hushmat Ultra foil backed dampening and then 3M Thinslate insulation on the floor, walls and ceiling. We have CRL windows behind the driver, on the sliding door and two smaller CRL windows in the rear, one on each side for ventilation by the bed. We installed 4 x 100aH of Battle Born batteries. We also went with a Victron 3000-watt inverter/charger - capable of converting 12v supply from the batteries for a 120v AC unit. The majority of the roof was free for solar panels. If we were going to add AC, we wanted an off-the-grid system (AC and Solar) which could, in a 24-hour cycle, generate enough solar power to replace the energy we consumed while the AC cooled the van to ~76 F while we slept.

Fast forward to 2023 and we decided to install air conditioning and solar into our Sprinter. The improvements and availability of 12v ACs and improvements and form factors for solar panels seemed to make off-the-grid AC (for sleeping) possible. Here’s a high-level overview of what we did.
We moved the MaxxAir fan from the back of the van to the front.
We then installed the 12v 8000 BTU AC unit from Velit in the 14” by 14” hole in the back of the Sprinter where the MaxxAir had been.
We also installed the solar system (Victron SmartSolar MPPT Charger + three Renogy 175-watt solar panels) with Rhino Rack front fairing added.

When we were looking at AC units, we were focused on efficiency, not only at full power but also at lower output levels. How many BTUs per watt could we get. The noise was also a consideration. The Velit AC uses a twin-rotor compressor which has good efficiency over a wide range while others use a scroll compressor which has similar efficiency at the high end but lower efficiency at lower RPMs.

Test 1&2: (cut out)

Test 3: 2 Cycles of Sleeping then Regen simulation: Simulating off-the-grid AC during the evening with the Sleeping Quarters curtained off then recharging with solar the next day.
When we started the project of adding AC, it was understood that our van’s layout could be utilized to optimize how much energy we used to cool our sleeping area. Our van has a queen bed elevated ~36” across the back of the van.

At 17:58 (about 6:00pm) started timed lapsed video. The Velit AC was started in Turbo or Boost mode – its highest output. An hour later it was turned to SLEEP mode. The sleeping area was kept at 75-76 all night. By 5:30am the next morning the AC was turned off with 45.6% of the battery remaining. One mistake I made was keeping the inverter powered which drew watts even though it was idle. I realized this an hour into the test and turned it off. (Data removed)

Lessons learned from Cycle 1 were applied to Cycle 2. Even though the van was quite hot from being closed, the AC cooled the sleeping quarters in 30-40 minutes. This meant that The AC could be turned on later in the evening, closer to sleeping time, thus saving some power. Due to an overcast day, the batteries recharged to 76% by 16:48 (~5pm) and actually reached 80.2% by the time the second cycle was started. You will notice that, overall, the first cycle ran net of draining the battery by 20%. Given the lessons learned from the first cycle, I was looking forward to the second cycle.

Cycle 2
Lessons learned from the second cycle. The Velit AC SLEEP mode is effective and efficient in cooling the sleeping area especially when it is dark (not fighting against the sun). The combination of mostly passive cooling the van and starting the AC later in the evening resulted in the system using 28.1% of the battery. The next day, the solar panels regenerated 39.1% of the battery. The net effect is a positive 11% of energy generated vs. consumed by the AC. If we ran the cycle for another day, the battery would be back up to 100%.

Conclusion
The above results give us confidence that we could stay stationary for three or more days and not have to worry about draining the batteries. In reality, we’ll be running other loads but those are quite small in comparison to the AC unit.

Overall, we are very pleased with this addition to our Sprinter. The system is effective at cooling the van and regenerating enough energy in a 24-hour cycle. The Velit AC was an easy install especially given it fits into the 14” x 14” hole that the MaxxAir previously occupied. It also seems to function as expected. The Velit AC and 175-watt Renogy panels are also a clean, low profile, no overhang installation on the roof. The Velit AC only rises 7” above the roof.

C
Chad Boaz

The Velit 2000R is a game changer. RV manufacturers have 2 go-to camper air conditioners. No matter how small your camper is, you usually get a 13.5K or a 15K BTU single speed compressor unit. Having a single speed compressor AC unit means that when the temp in your camper gets above your thermostat setpoint, the compressor kicks on full speed, drops the temp quickly and shuts back off. If the temperature is not extremely hot at night or your AC unit is oversized (most RV AC units are) this means the compressor only runs a few minutes at a time. This is called short cycling and it leaves you with a humid, uncomfortable air inside your RV. When an air conditioner compressor comes on, the heat exchanger coil inside the air conditioner becomes cold enough to condense the moisture in inside air thus lowering humidity. This is why water runs down the roof of your camper and onto the ground when the AC is on. This is the moisture being removed from the air in your camper and draining outside. This only happens when the AC compressor is on. Using those oversized, single stage units in most RVs means the compressor doesn't stay on long enough. Most people compensate for higher humidity by turning the thermostat down. That wastes energy that boondockers work hard to capture with solar panels and store in battery banks. Lower humidity levels are much more efficient too. With proper humidity levels you can actually raise your thermostat temp by around 5 degrees without sacrificing comfort. So, how can you lower humidity levels in your camper and save energy and money? That's where the Velit 2000R comes in. First of all it is a DC unit which means no more wasting energy on running an inefficient inverter for an AC unit. Inverter losses average around 10% of the total energy supplied by the inverter. If you are running an AC unit in your camper off battery power, that makes a huge difference. Secondly since the Velit has a variable speed compressor, the compressor can slow down to better match the space of your RV and outside temperature. This means no more short cycling and much lower humidity. The compressor stays on longer and more moisture is removed from the air. As a result you save energy, money and are much more comfortable.

After researching many options, we decided to install the Velit 2000R on our 2020 Rockwood GeoPro 19 foot bunkhouse model. We have five 12 volt 200AH lithium batteries and a 3000 watt inverter. We always had issues with uncomfortable sleep due to high humidity levels not to mention how loud our rooftop Dometic was. Additionally, we had to run our inverter all the time since the air conditioner was AC current. We looked at other DC units that were all MUCH more expensive before going with Velit. When the box arrived we saw everything packaged neatly and all the necessary supplies for install included. Most other DC air conditioning units make you buy them separately. We have tested the unit and, to our delight, have found out that running the Velit makes our camper air feel like our house and much quieter than our old rooftop unit. The efficiency is amazing too. Now when we go off grid camping, our battery lasts longer than our water does. Finally boondocking is also comfortable. Great job Velit for listening to what customers really want and giving it to them at an affordable price. Five stars.

J
JimFeet
What a relief!

Replaced my nearly new Dometic Penguin A/C unit with the Velit 2000R. The Velit installation in my 2021 Sprinter was actually easier than removal of the Dometic. I am a retired mechanical/electrical/software engineer so no stranger to HVAC. I found the Velit to be well built. So the remote isn't the highest quality but it does the job. But I didn't buy it for the remote. The components are high quality; the rooftop sealing gasket was virtually a duplicate of the original Dometic and the unit occupies less rooftop real estate which helped the installation process, improved aerodynamics and increased my solar view. Once installed and connected to 400 ah LiFePo4's supported by 300 watts solar we were in business. I live in Moab, UT where we have been 100 deg or more every day for the entire month of July. (It's a dry heat!) Obviously the Velit has to work hard (Turbo mode) to cool the Sprinter down after sitting in 108 deg sun all day. But if started in the morning when temps are about 75-80 deg, Eco mode is pretty efficient with little battery drain. The reduced noise level alone makes it worth the price - a considerable improvement over the Dometic. Overall, a great product at a reasonable price!

G
Gary Schultze
Velit works great- easy install!

The unit went in where my Maxaire fan was. Fit perfect and works great in the Sprinter 144. Watch for the install video on YouTube at Cyclone Custom. The crate it came in was so nice I kept the wood. Price is great, works as good as a Dometix RX20000. All install hardware is included except I made my own shroud out of all.

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